Commit b26240b4 authored by Aral Balkan's avatar Aral Balkan

Updated readme with the beginnings of the investigations and content authoring guidelines sections.

parent ba904990
......@@ -199,4 +199,27 @@ Here is an example of a site-specific blocking rule in MSON format:
``` 
```
The Blockdown parser in Better supports all of the [WebKit content blocking rules](https://webkit.org/blog/3476/content-blockers-first-look/). Instead of JSON, however, we enter blocking rules in MSON. All Blockdown rules are combined by Better Builder into a single `blockerList.json` file.
\ No newline at end of file
The Blockdown parser in Better supports all of the [WebKit content blocking rules](https://webkit.org/blog/3476/content-blockers-first-look/). Instead of JSON, however, we enter blocking rules in MSON. All Blockdown rules are combined by Better Builder into a single `blockerList.json` file.
# Investigation process
Currently, you need to have commit rights to the Content repository to use the Better commandline commands. However, you can use Git directly to fork the repository and submit merge requests and you can [add and edit pages through the online GitLab interface](https://source.ind.ie/better/content) without commit rights.
1. Start by editing the tracker: `better/edit drafts/trackers/somedoma.in`. This will create an issue in GitLab (or update an existing issue, if one already exists) and create our checkout a branch for you. It will also open your working copy of the tracker page in your system editor and in the browser.
2. First, enter the domain into your browser in a private window to see if it loads.
3. If it doesn’t load, or if you get a blank page, perform a whois. We are currently using http://whois.domaintools.com for these so we can link to is as a source when stating ownership information. However, you will sometimes get more information from a direct whois look-up on your machine. In Terminal: `whois somedoma.in`
4. Some trackers use a domain proxy or a cloaking service (e.g., Domains by Proxy) to further hide their origins. In this case, open up the source of some sites that the tracker originated on in the Web Developer console (Timeline view) of Safari (or in the web inspector of your browser of choice) and try to recreate the original call. That might give you more clues about its origin.
Other useful tools:
* [Wikipedia](wikipedia.org)
* [Mozilla Lightbeam](https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/lightbeam/)
# Content authoring guidelines
* Be brief: do not quote the whole privacy policy; pick out interesting bits.
* You can editorialise (with restraint). Sometimes you just have to laugh at the ridiculousness of some of the trackers that we’re covering. It also helps, when trudging through the cesspit of surveillance capitalism to retain our humour. And it also makes the pages more interesting to read (we don’t want to create a dry database). Please only add editorial comments for something unusually important or to highlight egregious abuses. A good rule of thumb would be: “would this make a good slide in a presentation to illustrate the problem with this particular thing or practice?” Editorial comments should be brief, marked with ‘– Ed.’ and limited to at most one per tracker.
* Use images (sparingly). Not every humdrum tracker page needs images. However, if you are making an editorial comment and you feel that a visual aid is important in highlighting the point, please feel free to use images. Images and screenshots should be 1,160px wide (to display well at their 580pt width on high resolution screens). Please resize and compress images properly. On Mac, [ImageOptim](https://imageoptim.com/mac) is a great application for compressing PNGs and [PhotoBulk](https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/photobulk-watermark-resize/id537211143?mt=12) is a convenient app for converting between formats.
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